Systemic corticosteroids meaning

Rolando Cimaz is Head of the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit at Meyer Children's Hopital in Florence, Italy and is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Florence, Italy. He graduated from Milan University in Italy in 1987, is a specialist in Pediatrics (1991) and in Rheumatology (2003) and did his Fellowship in Pediatric Rheumatology in Dallas, Texas, USA, in 1993-1994. He was Maitre de Conférences des Universités at Université Claude Bernard-Lyon I in Lyon, France from 2005 to 2007. His main interest is pediatric rheumatology and he has special expertise and scientific interest in osteoporosis, antiphospholipid antibodies, Kawasaki disease, synovial T cells and neonatal lupus. Currently he is involved in many research projects, nationally and internationally. He has been on the Council of the Pediatric Rheumatology European Society from 1999 to 2005 (treasurer) and from 2014-present (Research Chair). He is a member of the American College of Rheumatology, the Italian Society of Pediatrics and the French Society of Pediatric Inflammatory Diseases. He is co-author of more than 230 peer-reviewed articles on PubMed, as well as more than 20 book chapters, all in the field of pediatric rheumatology. He is or has been, on the Editorial board of several international journals (Pediatric Rheumatology Online Journal, Lupus, Arthritis and Rheumatism) and co-edited the book "Systemic Autoimmune Diseases in Pediatrics."

Corticosteroids are more potent than NSAIDs in reducing inflammation and restoring function when the disease is active. Corticosteroids are particularly helpful when internal organs are affected. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, injected directly into the joints and other tissues, or administered intravenously. Unfortunately, corticosteroids have serious side effects when given in high doses over prolonged periods, and the doctor will try to monitor the activity of the disease in order to use the lowest doses that are safe. Side effects of corticosteroids include weight gain , thinning of the bones and skin, infection, diabetes , facial puffiness, cataracts , and death (necrosis) of the tissues in large joints.

The study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of adult patients with severe asthma exacerbation who were admitted to the hospital for treatment. Admitted patients met criteria for hospitalization, and the decision to admit was made by a physician who was not involved in the study. All patients were treated with inhaled beta agonists every four hours as needed and with 40 mg of intravenous methylprednisolone every six hours for 48 hours. Participants were randomized to receive eight puffs of flunisolide (250 mcg per actuation) via a spacer twice daily or placebo. This therapy was initiated within 12 hours of admission. After 48 hours, the intravenous corticosteroid was discontinued, and patients began a course of therapy with oral prednisone or placebo. Patients who had received flunisolide were given placebo instead of prednisone. A follow-up visit was scheduled on day 7 of the study. Outcomes, which were measured on days 1 and 7, included peak expiratory flow rates, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 ), and symptom scores. Secondary outcome measures included hospital readmissions, emergency department revisits, and length of hospital stay.

There is high-quality evidence to support treatment of exacerbations of COPD with systemic corticosteroid by the oral or parenteral route in reducing the likelihood of treatment failure and relapse by one month, shortening length of stay in hospital inpatients not requiring assisted ventilation in ICU and giving earlier improvement in lung function and symptoms. There is no evidence of benefit for parenteral treatment compared with oral treatment with corticosteroid on treatment failure, relapse or mortality. There is an increase in adverse drug effects with corticosteroid treatment, which is greater with parenteral administration compared with oral treatment.

Systemic corticosteroids meaning

systemic corticosteroids meaning

There is high-quality evidence to support treatment of exacerbations of COPD with systemic corticosteroid by the oral or parenteral route in reducing the likelihood of treatment failure and relapse by one month, shortening length of stay in hospital inpatients not requiring assisted ventilation in ICU and giving earlier improvement in lung function and symptoms. There is no evidence of benefit for parenteral treatment compared with oral treatment with corticosteroid on treatment failure, relapse or mortality. There is an increase in adverse drug effects with corticosteroid treatment, which is greater with parenteral administration compared with oral treatment.

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