Steroids cats cancer treatment

  • Keep the tablets in a safe place, out of the reach of children.
  • If your doctor decides to stop the treatment, return any remaining tablets to the pharmacist. Do not flush them down the toilet or throw them away.
  • Tell your doctor if you are sick just after taking a tablet, as you may need to take another one.
  • If you forget to take your tablet, do not take a double dose. Ask your doctor or nurse for advice.
  • If you're having a short course of steroids as part of your treatment, do not get more from your GP.

Most currently used anti-cancer agents do not specifically target cancer cells. Rather, they target and damage or kill rapidly growing cells. For the patient, this means cells lining the stomach and intestine (high turnover rate), cells of the bone marrow that make up the immune system (white blood cells, in particular), and cancer cells. It then is little surprise that the most common side effects of chemotherapy agents include mild to moderate nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and increased risk of infection. Hair loss, in contrast to humans, is uncommon in dogs and cats on chemotherapy. The good news is that the normal cell lines can almost always regenerate themselves, while the less well organized malignant cells suffer great damage. However, even at higher dosages, microscopic malignant cell clones remain alive, albeit dormant in the body. Eventually these give rise to drug-resistant cell lines. This is the biological basis of recurrent or metastatic cancers.

We do not know which patients are predisposed to these tumors or all of the events that go into development of these tumors.  The risk of not vaccinating for certain diseases may be much higher than the risk of tumor development.  The best advice is to vaccinate discriminately and make educated decisions about which diseases your cat should be vaccinated for.  Please discuss your concerns about vaccination with your cat’s regular veterinarian.  Vaccination on the lower limbs and tail has been advocated, such that amputation of the affected leg or tail can be performed if a tumor should occur.  Cats that have been treated for an injection-site sarcoma should not receive any future vaccinations.

Treatment: If a pancreatic or liver tumor is identified and able to be surgically excised, the skin lesions may normalize for an extended period of time, but because these tumors metastasize (spread to other areas of the body) quickly, surgery is not curative. In cases of end stage liver disease, surgery is not possible, and the goal of therapy is to increase quality of life and decrease uncomfortable skin lesions with supportive care and addressing the nutritional abnormalities. Supportive care includes supplementing protein and necessary minerals and enzymes through the diet and oral supplements or by weekly intravenous amino acid infusions that are performed in the hospital on an outpatient basis until improvement in the skin is noted. Unfortunately, despite the supportive care, the disease will progress.

Fibrosarcoma is an aggressive and highly invasive type of cancer that originates in fibrous connective tissue. In cats, it is often associated with the feline leukemia virus, the feline immunodeficiency virus or administration of vaccines. Fibrosarcomas tend to occur as solitary skin masses on the head, in the mouth, on the trunk or on the legs. There is some association between certain inactivated feline vaccines and development of fibrosarcomas at the injection site. However, the potential for vaccine-associated reactions shouldn’t deter owners from vaccinating their cats. Surgical removal of fibrosarcomas is often possible. However, without wide clean surgical margins, these tumors often recur.

Steroids cats cancer treatment

steroids cats cancer treatment

Treatment: If a pancreatic or liver tumor is identified and able to be surgically excised, the skin lesions may normalize for an extended period of time, but because these tumors metastasize (spread to other areas of the body) quickly, surgery is not curative. In cases of end stage liver disease, surgery is not possible, and the goal of therapy is to increase quality of life and decrease uncomfortable skin lesions with supportive care and addressing the nutritional abnormalities. Supportive care includes supplementing protein and necessary minerals and enzymes through the diet and oral supplements or by weekly intravenous amino acid infusions that are performed in the hospital on an outpatient basis until improvement in the skin is noted. Unfortunately, despite the supportive care, the disease will progress.

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