Corticosteroid use on face

Using a nationwide dataset of private insurance claims, researchers identified patients aged 18–64 years who were enrolled from 2012–2014. The main outcomes included rates of short-term use of oral corticosteroids (defined as <30 days duration), rates of adverse events in corticosteroid users vs. non-users, and the rate ratios for adverse events within 30 day vs. 31–90 day risk periods after treatment initiation.   Related Articles

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Data abstracted retrospectively from the charts at 11,359 clinic visits for 310 patients with SLE to the Montreal General Hospital were used to investigate the associations of recent corticosteroid dose and recent Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score with 8 CHD risk factors (total serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein B [Apo B], triglycerides, systolic blood pressure [BP], body mass index, and blood glucose) and the aggregate estimate of 2-year CHD risk. Separate multivariable linear regression models estimated the mutually-adjusted effects of average daily corticosteroid dose and average SLEDAI score within the past year on the current level of each risk factor while adjusting for age, sex, cumulative damage score, disease duration, and, where appropriate, use of relevant medications.

Corticosteroid use on face

corticosteroid use on face

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