Coccyx steroid injection

Dr. Foye acknowledges and appreciates the numerous patients with coccyx pain who have traveled—often substantial distances—to see him over the years. Much has been learned by listening to descriptions of their symptoms and to their stories, by discovering how suffering from coccyx pain impacts the quality of their lives, and by analyzing their favorable responses to nonsurgical treatment. Their substantial contributions to the coccydynia knowledge base have helped in the treatment of many subsequent patients with coccyx pain, not only in Dr. Foye's practice, but (through his publications in this area) elsewhere as well. Dr. Foye finds it to be a gratifying privilege to help so many of these patients find relief.

8. CPT codes 64400-64530 describe injection of anesthetic agent for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes, the codes being distinguished from one another by the named nerve and whether a single or continuous infusion by catheter is utilized. All injections into the nerve including branches described (named) by the code descriptor at a single patient encounter constitute a single unit of service(UOS). For example:
(1) If a physician injects an anesthetic agent into multiple areas around the sciatic nerve at a single patient encounter, only one UOS of CPT code 64445 (injection, anesthetic agent; sciatic nerve, single) may be reported.
(2) If a physician injects the superior medial and lateral branches and inferior medial branches of the left genicular nerve, only one UOS of CPT code 64450 (Injection, anesthetic agent; other peripheral nerve or branch) may be reported regardless of the number of injections needed to block this nerve and its branches.

Ketamine infusion therapy, while rarely performed, can be very effective in treating neuropathic pain which is resistant to other treatments.  It is most commonly used for pain from RSD or CRPS (chronic regional pain syndrome).  It is also used in fibromyalgia, phantom limb pain, and postherpetic neuralgia.  In part, Ketamine infusion works on receptors in the central nervous system to reduce sensitivity to pain.  Francis Corrigan, . has the experience to confidently provide this advanced pain management technique for the rare patient who does not respond to other treatments. Dr. Corrigan is currently the only Pain Management doctor providing this treatment in the Raleigh, Durham and Cary marketplace. He has successfully treated patients in Pinehurst for several years with this advanced treatment option.

Between 1992 and mid 1996, we found one hundred and nine patients with coccygeal instability. They were treated conservatively (intradiscal injection). Thirty-one who did not respond and were severely disabled were offered surgery. Twenty-eight of the 31 surgical patients were followed up for more than one year. They had had pain for an average of 31 months. The dynamic films showed 17 luxations, and 11 hypermobility. The procedure was confined to the removal of the mobile bony element. The mean postoperative follow-up was 29 months (range: 12-53 months). Patients were assessed using a visual analogue scale, a verbal scale, and a clinical examination.

Coccyx steroid injection

coccyx steroid injection

Between 1992 and mid 1996, we found one hundred and nine patients with coccygeal instability. They were treated conservatively (intradiscal injection). Thirty-one who did not respond and were severely disabled were offered surgery. Twenty-eight of the 31 surgical patients were followed up for more than one year. They had had pain for an average of 31 months. The dynamic films showed 17 luxations, and 11 hypermobility. The procedure was confined to the removal of the mobile bony element. The mean postoperative follow-up was 29 months (range: 12-53 months). Patients were assessed using a visual analogue scale, a verbal scale, and a clinical examination.

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