Alopecia areata intralesional corticosteroid injections

The typical pattern is one or more bald patches appear on the scalp or any other part of the body. These tend to be around in shape, and about the size of a large coin. A Family member, friend, or hairdresser may be the first person to notice the bare patch or patches. Apart from the hairless patch, the scalp usually looks healthy. In few cases, the patient may feel redness, scaling, mild burning, or a slight itchy feeling on an affected part. Quite often the bald patch or patches re-grow hair within a few months. If hair grows back it may not have its primary color and looks grey or white. The original color eventually returns after several months. Sometimes, the initial hairless patch re-grows hair whilst a new bare patch is developing. Often several small hairless patches develop and merge into a larger bald area. Patches on body hair, beard, eyebrows, or eyelashes can be seen in some cases. Large bald patches develop in some people. Whole scalp hair loss is known as alopecia totalis and complete body hair loss is known as alopecia universalis. The nails are affected in about 1 in five cases and can become pitted or a bald patch first develops, it is difficult to predict how it will progress. Alopecia areata behaves in a different way in everyone. However below are the classifications of how it may progress.

Alopecia areata intralesional corticosteroid injections

alopecia areata intralesional corticosteroid injections

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